Spaghetti Squash

Spaghetti squash is the your first winter squash of the season. When cooked, this squash’s flesh falls away from the skin in ribbons, like spaghetti. It can be baked, boiled, or steamed, and it’s high in folic acid, vitamin A, potassium, and beta carotene.

Sorrel

That’s the little bunch of round, soft, green leaves that taste like lemon, sort of. Sorrel is a relative of rhubarb, and it has a sharp, sour taste. The French love it, and in England they used it in soups, sauces, and custards for centuries. It is generally used as a flavoring puree—you just simmerContinue reading “Sorrel”

Shallots

Shallots are a member of the Allium family along with onions and garlic. Some think they’re another variety of onion, but they’re actually a species of their own. The originate in Asia, but have become a staple in French cooking. Shallots have a nice, firm texture and flavor that is sweeter, milder than onions withContinue reading “Shallots”

Sage

Sage is a small, perennial evergreen herb with a long history of medicinal and culinary use. The smell of sage cooking often reminds people of Thanksgiving stuffing. It’s wonderful combined with winter squashes, sautéed in butter and served over pasta, tossed in soups, paired with most meats—especially fatty meats, in potato or bean dishes, andContinue reading “Sage”

Red Onions

Red Onions are spicier than candy onions, but still tend towards the sweeter side. They’re delicious raw or cooked. Onions are high in chromium, vitamin C, dietary fiber, and vitamin B6, so toss them in your next salad, on your sandwich, or add them to your grill basket when you’re grilling up some veggies.

Okra

Okra, the classic Cajun, African, Indian, or Mediterranean pod. The products of the plant are mucilaginous, resulting in the characteristic “goo” or slime when the seed pods are cooked. The goo is actually good for you—a soluble fiber that aids digestion. While many people enjoy okra any way, some prefer to minimize sliminess by keepingContinue reading “Okra”